Washington Township, Erie County, Pensylvania

 

2016 CCR Report

2016 CCR Report

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, ERIE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Public Water Supply ID# 625-0092 

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su aguade beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien lo entienda bien. (This report contains very important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak to someone who understands it.)

Purpose of this Report

Washington Township is pleased to present to you this Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for the year 2016.  The content and distribution of this report is regulated by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  The purpose of this report is to inform you about the quality of water and services we deliver to you every day.  Our constant goal is to provide you with a dependable supply of drinking water.  We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.  We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water. 

Washington Township is pleased to report that our drinking water meets federal and state requirements.

Washington Township is pleased to report that we had NO VIOLATIONS in 2016.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact David L. Anthony, Township Manager, at 814-734-3117 during regular office hours of 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. or mail your inquiry to 11800 Edinboro Road, Edinboro, PA 16412. For emergencies outside these hours, you may call the same number for further instructions. We want our valued customers to be informed about your water utility. If you would like to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled Sewer and Water Authority meetings, which are held on the second Thursday of the month, as necessary, at 7:00 P.M. at the Township Municipal Building.

WHERE YOUR WATER COMES FROM 

Our water sources are two groundwater wells. Both wells are approximately 65 feet deep and draw water from the underground aquifer north of Edinboro Lake.  The water is treated and disinfected with chlorine, then sent through the distribution piping to your home or business.  

SOURCES AND REGULATION OF CONTAMINANTS

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include: 

(a)   Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

(b) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

(c) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

(d) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

(e) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

 POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800–426–4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800–426–4791).

Information about Lead

Although no levels of lead above the action level were detected when last sampled in 2013, we are providing you this educational information about Lead for your own use:

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  Washington Township is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Note:  Washington Township regularly monitors for lead in the drinking water at locations throughout the distribution system in accordance with the DEP’s Lead and Copper Rule.  While we can control the plumbing materials used in our water treatment and distribution system, Washington Township cannot control the variety of plumbing materials used in individual homes, which may contribute to the presence of lead in drinking water.

Information about Arsenic 

While your drinking water meets EPA’s standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic.  EPA’s standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water.  EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

REGULATED CONTAMINANTS DETECTED IN 2015 

As discussed above, drinking water normally contains small amounts of contaminants.  The Pennsylvania DEP and U.S. EPA set standards to regulate the amount of these contaminants that may be present in public drinking water supplies.  Washington Township employs skilled, licensed operators to monitor our water supply, treatment, and distribution to ensure that your drinking water meets these standards.

At the end of this report is a table that identifies those contaminants that were detected in the Washington Township water supply in 2015.  Also listed are the maximum contaminant levels (MCL) allowed by Pennsylvania DEP and U.S. EPA and likely sources of the contaminant.  We are required to monitor for many more contaminants than are shown in the table; contaminants that are not listed in the table were not detected.

EXPLANATION OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

In this report there are many terms and abbreviations that may not be familiar to our customers.  An explanation of these terms and abbreviations is as follows: 

¨     Non-detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present at a detectable level.

¨     Parts-per-million (ppm) – one part per million, corresponds to the one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

¨     Parts-per-billion (ppb) – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

¨     Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of radioactivity in your water.

¨     Action Level (AL) – The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

¨     Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL – The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

¨     Maximum Containment Level Goal or MCLG – The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

¨     Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL - The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that the addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

¨     Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to the control microbial contaminants.

¨     Minimum Residual Disinfectant Level or MinRDL – The minimum level of residual disinfectant required at the entry point to the distribution system.

¨     Treatment Technique (TT) – A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

HELP US TO HELP YOU

Washington Township tends to your water needs in an attempt to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources by being our eyes and ears of the public water system.  If you observe unknown persons operating valves or hydrants, please call the Township office to question the activity. If you have any questions or comments about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact David L. Anthony, Township Manager, at 814-734-3117 during regular office hours of 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. or mail your inquiry to 11800 Edinboro Road, Edinboro, PA 16412, or via e-mail, washington@coaxpa.com. For emergencies outside these hours, you may call the same number for further instructions.

Please be conservative with your use of our most valuable natural resource…water.

Contaminants Detected in the Washington Township Water Supply in 2015 

Detected Sample Results

Contaminant

(date sampled if not in 2015) 1

Violation

(yes/no)

Highest Level Detected

Range of

Detections 2

MCL

MCLG

Likely Source of Contamination

Arsenic (2012)

No

9 ppb

9 ppb

10 ppb

n/a

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

Barium (2012)

No

0.502 ppm

0.502 ppm

2.0 ppm

2 ppm

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

Chlorine

No

1.18 ppm

0.42 to 1.18 ppm

MRDL =

4 ppm

MRDLG = 4 ppm

Water additive used to control microbes

Total Trihalomethanes

No

1.21 ppb

0.0 to 1.21 ppb

80 ppb

n/a

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Haloacetic Acids

No

0.552 ppb

0.462 to 0.552 ppb

60 ppb

n/a

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Dichloromethane

No

1.12 ppb

0.0 to 1.12 ppb

5 ppb

0.0

Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factories 

Entry Point Disinfectant Residuals

Contaminant

 

Violation

(yes/no)

Minimum Required Disinfectant Level

Lowest Level Detected

Range of Detections

Likely Source of Contamination

Chlorine

No

0.40 ppm

0.45 ppm

0.45 to 0.85 ppm

Water additive used to control microbes

Lead and Copper

Contaminant

(date sampled if not in 2015) 1

Violation

(yes/no)

90th Percentile

Value

Action Level (AL)

MCLG

No. of Sites Above AL

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper (2013)

No

0.394 ppm

1.3 ppm

1.3 ppm

0 out of 5

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

Lead (2013)

No

0 ppb

15 ppb

0 ppb

0 out of 5

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Footnotes:          1.   The state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not

        change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

  2.   Where the range includes only one value, only one sample was required.

Help Improve water & Sewer Billing

  We have improved our utility billing to allow e-billing of your bills. Due to the change by the U.S. Post Office of mail sorting in Pittsburgh rather than Erie, the time for mailings to turn around and arrive has lengthened. In addition we have seen an increase in lost billing in the mail. We strongly encourage you to contact your local Post Office and inform them of missing mail (we may not be the only mail your not getting) but also give serious consideration to e-billing so that hard paper copies are eliminated completely. If you visit https://washtwp.authoritypay.com and register, you can see all your billing online and receive notification of future billing via email, safe and simple. Let us know if we can help and hope your consider this service to improve your billing of utilities. 

 

  Water and Sewer Information  

Please click here to download or view the 2014 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su aguade beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien lo entienda bien. (This report contains very important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak to someone who understands it.

Sewer/ Water Authority merged

The Washington Township Water Authority is officially dissolved and the Sewer Authority has taken over the duties of the Water Authority, creating the Washington Township Sewer/ Water Authority. This combination will improve the services of the Authority and make a one stop shop for developers to move more effectively through the detailed process. We appreciate the dedication of all the Authority members. 

 

Backflow Preventors

The Washington Township Sewer/Water Authority rules and regulations require the regular inspection of backflow preventors on all non-residential connections to the public system. A copy of the rules are attached for your information. Please forward them to the appropriate body so that the rules are adhered to and inspections are performed and recorded. If you have any questions concerning these rules and regulations, please contact Joe Yurcak, DPW Coordinator, at 734-1063 during regular business hours 7:00 am to 3:00 pm, M-F. Those who do not perform the required inspection will face fines and/or possible shut-off of water services for failure to abide by the rules and regulations. 

 Download the Backflow Preventor Regulations (.doc)

 Download the Backflow Preventor Inspection Report (.doc)

 

Smoke Testing finds Inflow and Infiltration

Washington Township continually seeks to find sources of I&I (inflow and infiltration) of clean water into the sewer system . This costs the sewer users unnecessarily as they pay for the treatment of clean water. The systems pays per gallon, clean or not. Therefore it is of highest priority to remove any and all sources of I&I. We have many tools to seek out and identify those problem areas. This video sources the results of a recent smoke test in the Township that reveals a downspout attached to the sewer system. Notice the non toxic smoke rising out of the spout and at the ground connection. A clean violation of the Township's rules and regulations.  The owner will be responsible to correct this problem immediately. A large amount of rain water is being directed into the sewer system when these violations occur. Rather than risk a fine, we suggest you contact the Township to have your system inspected. All homes in the sewer and water districts that are sold are required to have an inspection done by Township personnel prior to transfer closing.

 

 

 

Unflushables

Inflow and Infiltration Inspections

Washington Township continues to be aggressive with I & I within the sewer system. I & I is not typical sewage; Washington Township pays the Borough of Edinboro to treat sewage every month. Treatment costs are expensive and affect users' fees. The Sewer Department will be conducting smoke testing to find illegal drains connected to the Township Sewer lines. This may intail roof drains, sup-pumps, stormwater drains, etc., and if found, the property owner is liable for fines. If you are concerned that you may have an illegal connection that you wish to correct, please call the Township office to schedule an inspection.

New Truck Purchase

New Washington Township TruckWashington Township has added a new vehicle to their fleet. It is a 2013 GMC work body pickup to service the DPW/ Water Department needs. Click on the photo for a larger view.

 

 

New Sewer Customers come Online

Washington Township is pleased to report that the Edinboro Mobile Home Village on Capp Road is now a utilizing the public sewer system. The mobile home park had its own sewage treatment system for years, but due to needs to reduce potential problems in the operation and maintenance under Department of Environmental Protection rules and regulations, the owner made the conscientious decision further safeguard the environment and tap into the nearby public system. This is the result of the massive undertaking by Washington Township to remove its discharge from Edinboro Lake hand have  the Borough of Edinboro’s topnotch treatment operation properly treat and discharge the effluent. The multimillion-dollar expansion and redirection of the old Angling Road treatment plant will service our community for many years to come. These additional customers also will stabilize the rates for current customers as well. As growth has been minimal within the Township, additional customers are most welcome.

PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT

Washington Township is pleased to present to you this Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for the year 2012. The content and distribution of this report is regulated by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The purpose of this report is to inform you about the quality of water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water.

Washington Township is pleased to report that our drinking water meets federal and state requirements.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact David L. Anthony, Township Manager, at 814-734-3117 during regular office hours of 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. or mail your inquiry to 11800 Edinboro Road, Edinboro, PA 16412. For emergencies outside these hours, you may call the same number for further instructions. We want our valued customers to be informed about your water utility. If you would like to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled Water Authority meetings, which are held on the third Thursday of the month, as necessary, at 7:00 P.M. at the Township Municipal Building.

WHERE YOUR WATER COMES FROM

 

Our water sources are two groundwater wells. Both wells are approximately 65 feet deep and draw water from the underground aquifer north of Edinboro Lake. The water is treated and disinfected with chlorine, then sent through the distribution piping to your home or business.

 

SOURCES AND REGULATION OF CONTAMINANTS

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800–426–4791).

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800–426–4791).


Information about Lead

 

REGULATED CONTAMINANTS DETECTED IN 2011

EXPLANATION OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

In this report there are many terms and abbreviations that may not be familiar to our customers. An explanation of these terms and abbreviations is as follows:

Non-detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present at a detectable level.

Parts-per-million (ppm) – one part per million, corresponds to the one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts-per-billion (ppb) – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of radioactivity in your water.

Action Level (AL) – The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL – The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Containment Level Goal or MCLG – The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL - The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that the addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminant

 

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to thcontrol microbial contaminants.

HELP US TO HELP YOU

Washington Township tends to your water needs in an attempt to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources by being our eyes and ears of the public water system. If you observe unknown persons operating valves or hydrants, please call the Township office to question the activity. If you have any questions or comments about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact David L. Anthony, Township Manager, at 814-734-3117 during regular office hours of 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. or mail your inquiry to 11800 Edinboro Road, Edinboro, PA 16412, or via e-mail, washington@coaxpa.com. For emergencies outside these hours, you may call the same number for further instructions.

Please be conservative with your use of our most valuable natural resource…water.

 

Contaminants Detected in the Washington Township Water Supply in 2011

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, ERIE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Public Water Supply ID# 625-0092

Disinfectant Levels and Disinfection Byproducts
Contaminant
(Date sampled if not in 2011)
Violation
(Yes/No)
Highest Level Detected Range of Detections MCL MCLG Likely Source of Contamination
Chlorine No 0.55 ppm 0.11 to 0.55 ppm MRDL = 4 ppm MRDLG = 4 ppm Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids
(9/2009)
No 5.8 ppb 5.3 to 5.8 ppb 60 ppb N/A By-product of drinking water chlorination
Total Trihalomethanes
(9/2009)
No 10.5 ppb 5.2 to 10.5 ppb 80 ppb N/A By-product of drinking water chlorination
   

Water Reads Go High Tech!

The Water Department is in the process of switching all water customers' meter readings over to radio reads. This service will be more efficient than the old auto-dialer system in which your meter reads were received by us via phone with a designated computer and software. The readings will be collected by an employee driving by your home. We anticipate this new system to help all our water customers and we will enable us to provide better service.

Inflow and Infiltration (I & I) Checks

The Sewer Department continues checking sewer lines and laterals for inflow and infiltration. Many lines are old and have been damaged by roots. The reason for these checks is to stop ground water from coming into the sewer lines. Washington Township pays Edinboro Borough to treat our sewage and if we are sending clean water along with sewage, then our costs will continue to rise. The Crews are looking for sump-pumps, roof drains, and other illegal connections to the public sewer system. The infiltration of stormwater cannot continue in Washington Township if we intend to keep costs down and the monthly bills from skyrocketing.

Sewer Department Notice

The sewer rate in Washington Township wil be $75.00 per month. Sewer and water billing are now combined on one billing statement for your convenience. Both water and sewer service will be billed monthly. We do accept credit card payments via phone or at the Office. If you have any questions pertaining to billing, please call the Office and talk to Kelly.

Reminder

Washington Township wishes to remind our residents in the Sewer District that if you are buying or selling your home, it is required by Ordinance #1-04 that the homes must be inspected to insure that there is no inflow or infiltration to the Township's sewer lines. This also insures the new homeowners of purchasing an inspected home that is not in violation with the Township's Code. Residents found in violation of the Ordinance risk a significant fine. If you have questions, please our Office.